Engineering 6806
Required Documents


Log Book | Project Management Document | Preliminary Design Document | Critical Design Document | Final Report | Notes


Log Book

A log book must be maintained by each team member. The log book, which serves as a technical diary, must contain an account of the work performed and an account of time spent on the project with a breakdown according to the defined tasks. In many industrial projects, the client is billed (e.g. monthly) based on the time spent by the contractor's staff.

Project Management Document

The project management document includes a Work Plan (baseline and tracking Gantt charts) and a Resource Allocation Table (baseline and tracking). The baselines are generally generated during proposal development and updated (tracking) as required during execution of the project. The project management document provides a concise overview of the state of a project and must be revised regularly by the project team. The faculty has purchased several copies of Microsoft Project which can be used for the project management plan. Other packages, such as Lotus 1-2-3, can also be used.

In developing the project management plan, teams should budget no less than 120 hours per person to the project which corresponds to 10 hours per week over the 12 weeks prior to submitting the final project. Teams must take responsibility for balancing the workload across the team and for identifying and addressing (in consultation with the instructor) any time management problems that occur.

Changes to the project management plan must be discussed with the instructors before they are adopted by the team.

Preliminary Design Document

The Preliminary Design Document must include a description of the application and constraints, a detailed discussion of the overall strategy, and a discussion of the conceptual design variations for the overall system and for any sub-systems. This document must be no longer than 15 single-spaced typed pages (12pt font, 1" margins) including figures but excluding the project management plan. The report must include:

  1. Description of the application and constraints.
  2. Discussion of the overall competition strategy.
  3. Functional specifications for the system and the sub-systems.
  4. Discussion of design variants and selection of design.
  5. Assessment of risks and risk mitigation strategies.
  6. Block diagrams for the system and sub-systems.
  7. Descriptions of the system and sub-systems.
  8. Interfaces for all software modules.
  9. Project management plan including

Note on STRATEGY

The strategy is your general approach to solving the problem. For example, consider that a potential client asks for you to provide a proposal to develop an automated system for fish processing. In your proposal you would outline your strategy for solving the client's problem. Knowing that the client is interested in getting the most value from the processing operation, you may propose the strategy of developing a flexible system that can adapt to the variations in the size of fish. This strategy would have the advantage of increasing the amount of meat recovered in comparison to using a system that does not adapt to size variations. You would also recognize some of the negative implications of your strategy. For example, a flexible system would likely cost more than a system that does not adapt to size variations.

Your strategy would reflect the objectives of the client. In the case of fish processing, the client may require that the fish be processed at a rate of 300 fish/min. In view of this constraint, your strategy could be to use non-contact sensors (e.g. vision system, laser or ultrasonic rangefinder) and cutting technology (e.g. high-speed water-jet cutting) to measure the physical dimensions of each fish and to perform an optimal cut. Finally, since each fish will be different, your strategy could be to employ adaptive pattern recognition techniques (e.g. statistical, neural networks, fuzzy logic) to map the sensor information into cutting trajectories.

Prior to undertaking the system design, your team must have a clearly defined strategy for solving the problem.

Critical Design Document

The Critical Design Document must be a comprehensive account of the progress on the system and each of the sub-systems. This document must be no longer than 25 single-spaced typed pages (12pt font, 1" margins) including figures but excluding the project management plan. The report should extend the Preliminary Design Document to include:

  1. Schematics and descriptions of all sub-system circuits.
  2. A discussion and justification of any changes to the original strategy or designs presented in the Preliminary Design Document.
  3. A discussion of the state of the project in relation to the project management plan.

Final Report

The Final Report must be a comprehensive report on the design and performance of the system and the sub-systems. The report must be no longer than 35 single-spaced typed pages (12pt font, 1" margins) including figures but excluding the project management plan. The report should extend the Critical Design Document to include:

  1. A discussion and justification of any changes to the system or sub-system designs as described in the Critical Design Document.
  2. A detailed discussion of the performance and limitations of the system and subsystems.
  3. A discussion of the baseline and tracking project management plans.
  4. Complete parts list for the system.

Notes:


Back to 6806 course homepage

Last modified: Monday July 23, 2001 by Ray Gosine